Monday, March 4, 2013

Eight things I have learned from my family that I am grateful for

There are some things I've learned from my family, and for which I am very grateful for and I hope I will be able to pass them to my children.


 




1. About the School - it always has to be the most important thing to you

 

If you do not finish school, you'll face the bad choice of lousy jobs and wages insufficient to cover living expenses (which I have experienced in my student days and luckily didn't quit school because of  "a career" in McDonald's).

Never cease to learn and improve your skills. Always read something new.  Be a member of the local library. Learn foreign languages.




2. About the money - it does not grow on trees. You have to earn it. 

 

No one will give you the money for no reason. If somebody offers you money, there is some interest in this, and you have to check what kind of interest it is (or more clearly: Do not talk to suspicious strangers).

In my family, money has always been tight. Like most people, the 80s and the 90s were extremely difficult to us (and it is not much better these days) and I had to work so I could go to the university (see No. 1). Often I was furious about it, blamed politicians and I sometimes didn't show my best on the exams  due to being physically exhausted , but today I realize how it was a useful experience.




3. About the savings - you can only spend the money you have


This part I can especially thank to my grandparents, who remembered even more difficult times and who used to say that every penny needs to be rolled over twice before you spend it. Money buys the necessary things, and you should save the rest, "for a rainy day."

4. About the nature - Recycle.

 

Again, I thank to my grandparents who taught me to recycle. The fact I've learned it, is sort of responsible for starting this blog and for all the toys we made ​​from recycled materials .

Nothing should be thrown away, especially bread.  You can find a new purpose of each thing and if you must throw it away, take it to the appropriate container or a recycling yard. The nature is a gift from heaven, and you need you to preserve it.




5. About happines - it's in the little things

 

Money is needed to buy necessary things (see No. 3), but it can not buy happiness. A sunny day is a reason enough to be happy. And if you are done with all the work (see No. 7), you can go for a walk, what else do you need?



6. About a waste of time - long phone conversations, watching soap operas, reading gossip magazines and drinking at the pub are a waste of time, and not resting and relaxing, as it is now popularly called. Period.

 


 7. About leasure time - you can only get rest when you have finished all of your chores.


Going to the pub is not a "rest"  (See No 6). Chores are a necessity and must be done. Whining does not help, it only prolongs their performance. Get it done and then you can rest. Period.




8. About business- you're important to us, but the world does not revolve around you. 


When you get a job and start working,  your colleagues and employers will not dance around you or entertain you. The most important is the quality, not the quantity of work- the employer wants to see in which way  you can improve its performance, not how long you stay in the office. You need to work for yourself, not for the others. Someone else's job is always someone else's job.


***

It makes no sense to pretend that everything in my family was always perfect, because it was not, and there is not such a thing as perfection, but I'm really grateful for they taught me to deal with the difficulties in life, even when they are not there for me any more, and I think that's the most important task for any parent.



14 comments:

  1. Visiting from SITS! I have teens and tweens and I have tried very hard to instill in them a strong value system with these types of lessons!

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    1. I have a preschooler and a toddler, so I still can't explain them all the stuff I've mentioned in my post, so I was more writing about myself and my own upbringing but I sure intend to raise them in that way. However, I think I've definitely learned them about recycling.

      Glad you like it and thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Thanks for posting about gratitude. It's so important to find things in your life to be grateful about. Followed you from SITS. Have a blessed day!

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    1. Glad you like it and thanks for stopping by!

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  3. Thanks for sharing at Real Family Fun link party.
    KC

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  4. Love this~ New follower ~ Paula www.callmepmc.com

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    1. Glad you like it and thanks for stopping by!

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  5. Great list. It reminds me that my kids are not too young to learn the basic concepts of managing money. Visiting you from SITS.

    Regards,
    Honeybee
    http://herweightlossdiary.blogspot.com/

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    1. Yes, I agree on that, it's never too early

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  6. I'm also drawn to the ageless-ness of your list. Sometimes I find myself scolding my teen....and then I realize I also need to hear the words coming out of my mouth. Hopefully she doesn't think I'm too crazy.
    ♡ Jill

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    1. She'll be thankfull one day, I'm 100% sure

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  7. Visiting from SITS! These are all of the things I learned from my family! Especially the saving money one! My grandfather was BIG on saving money! Great post. Stopping in from SITS!

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    1. I read an article about generations born in the beginning of the 20th century, going through two world wars, experiencing The Great Depression in the 30s - so the frugality and saving money was their lifestyle and necessity

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